The Effects of Color

Tweet Color is powerful. It can cause reactions, sway opinions, raise blood pressure, curb your appetite, and relax your mind, all in a split second.  Our response to color is subliminal, but very real. That’s why the colors you choose … Read More

Color is powerful. It can cause reactions, sway opinions, raise blood pressure, curb your appetite, and relax your mind, all in a split second.  Our response to color is subliminal, but very real. That’s why the colors you choose for your home are so important. Do you want your home to be calm and soothing, or bright and energetic? Or, do you want to combine several hues to create a more balanced feel? You might be thinking that a major color overhaul to your home is too expensive or too much of a commitment, but it doesn’t have to be. Changing out the art on your walls is an easy and affordable way to experiment with the color and mood of your home. There has been a lot of research on the psychology of color, and the following has been found to be true. Black Black is elegant and timeless. When combined with other colors, it adds contrast and helps ground the space. Artwork: Floret Purple III by Sia Aryai   White White symbolizes cleanliness and purity, and goes well with just about any color. It reflects light, so it can make a small room appear big and bright. Artwork: City Bird by Judy Paul   Red Red is a bold and powerful color that demands attention. It's a passionate color that represents love as well as anger. People often experience elevated heart rate and increased enthusiasm in red rooms. Used as an accent, red will immediately draw the eye to that particular element. Artwork: Grid Formation I by Christine Wilkinson Blue Blue is one of the most popular colors, and appeals equally to both men and women. It's often used in bedrooms because of its peaceful and calming properties. It is also said to increase productivity and creativity, making it an excellent color for an office environment. Blue is also known to suppress the appetite, since there are very few blue foods found in nature. Artwork: Equis I by St. John Green Green is the color of renewal, balance, and nature. Like blue, it's a calming color and makes time seem to go by faster. Television studios have “green rooms” to help guests relax before going on the air. Artwork: Zen Garden I by Sia Aryai Yellow Yellow is bright, perky, and cheerful, but it can also evoke anger. Used in abundance, yellow can be overpowering, as it is the most difficult color for the eye to process. Still, it's considered a happy color of optimism and hope. The addition of yellow in a room can add the feeling of sunshine, even if there isn’t any. Artwork: Harmonia IV by Sia Aryai Purple Purple is the color of royalty and mystery. It possesses the energy of red and the calming effects of blue. Used in a room, it can stimulate creativity. Darker versions of the color evoke moodiness and wealth. Artwork: Natural Expression I by Sara Abbott Brown Brown is typically a favorite of men as it is associated with earth, wood, and natural materials.  Shades of brown, including tans, make an excellent backdrop to allow other colors to pop. In a room brown can evoke warmth, dependability, honesty, and friendliness. Artwork: Hidden Meanings XIV by Caroline Ashton

New Artist: Christine Wilkinson

Tweet If you haven’t noticed already, we’ve been finding some pretty awesome artists to join our family. This of course means more unique and new art for all of you! We just launched artwork from Christine Wilkinson. Her digital abstract … Read More

If you haven't noticed already, we've been finding some pretty awesome artists to join our family. This of course means more unique and new art for all of you! We just launched artwork from Christine Wilkinson. Her digital abstract collection has a lot of a psychedelic feel to it with it's shapes and colors. Christine started hand drawing these shapes back in school in the 60's, a foreshadow to what she would be doing later in life...working as an artist currently in London, England. She explores with her camera using light in many different forms: light on light, light through objects and light reflected off objects. I find this piece, Diving for Pearls, so interesting with the movement all the lines create and the layers and lightness of the different color. Though a lot of her art seems to be inspired from the psychedelic 1960's counterculture, in some ways I felt this piece was modern or even futuristic. It reminded me of a red robotic eye.   These two companion pieces, Green Pinko I & II, are very soft and feminine. They too also give us a feel of movement. I could imagine this is what it would look like up-close and inside of a bubble. These series of images, Grid Formation I-III, give us a more abstract, rigid and masculine feel. The repetitious elements seem to resemble a candle burning motif. The different stages keep your eye moving along. So if you like what you've seen so far on this post, check out more of Wilkinson's amazing art on Gallery Direct!