New Artist: Wyn Bielaska

Tweet I am very excited about introducing our next new artist, Wyn Bielaska. I have the same passion about architecture, art and graphic design that he does. Wyn is an architect that has worked on a wide range of projects … Read More

I am very excited about introducing our next new artist, Wyn Bielaska. I have the same passion about architecture, art and graphic design that he does. Wyn is an architect that has worked on a wide range of projects in the United States, Canada, China, Europe, and the Middle East. He has also been teaching option studios in the Masters Program at the Faculty of Architecture (now called the Faculty of the Built Environment), University of Washington, since 2002. Being a former Architecture and Graphic Design major in college, I was so happy to see Wyn's art roll in to Gallery Direct. You can see his background in his art, it has an architectural flair & structure and it also has a graphic design edge to it. Last month we released his "Ship Hulls" series. Here are some of my favorites: 21 Again II Noguchi Lost                  

Shirley Williams Art Prints

Tweet Have you checked out the art we’ve launched on Gallery Direct by Shirley Williams? I love getting to know our artists, and was able to meet Shirley face to face. She’s very sweet and I love her art! She, … Read More

Have you checked out the art we've launched on Gallery Direct by Shirley Williams? I love getting to know our artists, and was able to meet Shirley face to face. She's very sweet and I love her art! She, like us here at the Gallery Direct Blog, loves to blog about her work and what she's doing at her studio. Start following her on Shirley Williams Art Blog. Her abstract paintings show so much movement. The colors are so clean and vibrant. Her art would brighten up any space! Some of my favorite pieces by her are: Transforming Current II Horizon IV   Core Brick Which is your favorite? Stay tuned into the Gallery Direct Blog, I will be sharing about another new artist we recently launched!    

New Artists: Shirley Williams & Bob Hunt

Tweet We are excited to announce 2 new artists that have joined our family. First is Shirley Williams. Shirley lives and works in Canada and has been professionally painting for more than 15 years now. In her art she focuses … Read More

We are excited to announce 2 new artists that have joined our family. First is Shirley Williams. Shirley lives and works in Canada and has been professionally painting for more than 15 years now. In her art she focuses on intrinsic energies of color and organic form. We're super happy to have her work in our line now. I conducted an e-interview with Shirley, the Q&A's are below... WL102A, Horizons III Q: What or who inspired you to paint? How did you discover your talent for art? A: My first memory of wanting to become a painter was at the age of 11. It may sound like a cliche, but I remember standing in front of the Mona Lisa at the Louvre awed by the power of a painting to emanate such energy. It was as though I'd been struck by a profound thunderbolt. From that moment I knew my path would be forever changed. WL104A, Natural Wonders I Q: Do you work certain hours each day or only when you are inspired to work? A: I'm very blessed to have a 1500 sq. ft. studio in a white-walled renovated warehouse. I work every day, usually from 10 - 6 and have a studio assistant who comes in occasionally to help me. Normally I handle the business side of things for a few hours every morning. Then I have lunch, meditate and get to the creative work in the afternoon. My original paintings are multi-layered and can take a month to finish, so I'm usually working on several at once. Then of course there's always a lot of non-creative studio work to get done such as preparing canvases, shipping work to galleries etc. So it's definitely a full-time job. WL107A, Core Bice Q: How long have you been painting? How many pieces have you painted? What mediums do you use? A: I've been painting full-time for 19 years. Mostly I work in acrylic on canvas, and also enjoy working with mixed media and encaustic wax on paper. In an average year, I normally I finish 10 - 20 large scale canvases, 40 - 50 small canvases and countless works on paper. WL115A, Transforming Whorl I Q: Your new work that we just published is abstract, do you only paint abstract or do you paint other subjects? A: Although my formal training included learning how to draw, recreating something realistic have never been interesting to me. I'm more inspired by the challenge of creating something that will move people emotionally in a way they may not be able to put their finger on. It's the mystery of questioning what we see and how we respond to it that fascinates me. Introducing our next new artist, Bob Hunt. Bob is a local artist here in Central Texas. His abstract paintings are filled with vibrant colors and texture. We've just recently launched 20 new images by him. From left to right: When will we be able to relax, Obtrude, and Amalgamate I. His art can definitely bring color to any room you put it in. We especially love his art for wall coverings, like shown above. So please, come check out our new artists and new images on Gallery Direct today!

New Artist: Christine Wilkinson

Tweet If you haven’t noticed already, we’ve been finding some pretty awesome artists to join our family. This of course means more unique and new art for all of you! We just launched artwork from Christine Wilkinson. Her digital abstract … Read More

If you haven't noticed already, we've been finding some pretty awesome artists to join our family. This of course means more unique and new art for all of you! We just launched artwork from Christine Wilkinson. Her digital abstract collection has a lot of a psychedelic feel to it with it's shapes and colors. Christine started hand drawing these shapes back in school in the 60's, a foreshadow to what she would be doing later in life...working as an artist currently in London, England. She explores with her camera using light in many different forms: light on light, light through objects and light reflected off objects. I find this piece, Diving for Pearls, so interesting with the movement all the lines create and the layers and lightness of the different color. Though a lot of her art seems to be inspired from the psychedelic 1960's counterculture, in some ways I felt this piece was modern or even futuristic. It reminded me of a red robotic eye.   These two companion pieces, Green Pinko I & II, are very soft and feminine. They too also give us a feel of movement. I could imagine this is what it would look like up-close and inside of a bubble. These series of images, Grid Formation I-III, give us a more abstract, rigid and masculine feel. The repetitious elements seem to resemble a candle burning motif. The different stages keep your eye moving along. So if you like what you've seen so far on this post, check out more of Wilkinson's amazing art on Gallery Direct!

New Artist: Brett Pfister

Tweet Gallery Direct is excited to welcome another new artist to our family, Brett Pfister. Brett is the Print operator for The Canyon Gallery and owner of Mind’s Eye Productions. His background and degree is in Graphic Design, this knowledge shows … Read More

Gallery Direct is excited to welcome another new artist to our family, Brett Pfister. Brett is the Print operator for The Canyon Gallery and owner of Mind's Eye Productions. His background and degree is in Graphic Design, this knowledge shows in his photo treatment and technique in his digital art. Besides being a professional Graphic Designer and Artist, Brett also does Photography, Video Production and Web Design. This is one of my favorite new images by him, Veiled Eden. The female figure and soaring birds really draw you into this image wondering what could be going on in this "garden of Eden". The texture and lightness peaking through the trees really make it interesting as well. This new image, Intrepid Home, is being printed on aluminum to be hung in our office gallery right next to our CEO's office door. Brett has a couple really fascinating images using barren trees, including Stretching, Nostrum Locus, The Ends of the Earth, and Cynon Valley. This image, Break, is also going up in our office gallery. The color, technique and texture he uses in this image really give meaning to it's title. It's a beautiful piece. Come check out the rest of Brett's images on Gallery Direct!

New Artist: Andreas Langley

Tweet Yesterday we launched artwork from Andreas Langley, our newest member of the New Era – Gallery Direct family. His art is very unique as it is of something we’ve never seen! He explores the mystery and wonder of ancient crystals … Read More

Yesterday we launched artwork from Andreas Langley, our newest member of the New Era - Gallery Direct family. His art is very unique as it is of something we've never seen! He explores the mystery and wonder of ancient crystals revealing to us layers never seen before. Andreas has "an inherent and spontaneous drive for spirituality and a passion for metaphysics". Andreas grew up in both Europe and the United States but now resides in Arizona. He has a background in broadcast television and film. But lucky for us he explores in the visual arts by revealing the micro cosmos of mineral consciousness expressed in crystalline form of quartz. Above are 2 companion pieces, Record Keeper and Gateway Mystical. Andreas describes them as follows... Energies take shape in other worldly Gnome formations and entice with warm Salamander glow... A gateway offering to a forgotten Land of Dreams. In this series of 3, Spirit Timberland, Andreas describes them as follows...  The Nature Spirit of Forest and Trees expressing its range of energies in its mystical workings. [caption id="attachment_1282" align="alignnone" width="528" caption="LY114A Triumphant Celebration by Andreas Langley"][/caption] We hope you enjoy Andreas' work as much as we do! Click here to visit his gallery of work.  

New Artist: Stella Alesi

Tweet This is an exciting week, we get to launch artwork from a new artist that has joined our New Era family! We are introducing Stella Alesi, who resides in Austin, Texas and has a very distinct style of painting. … Read More

This is an exciting week, we get to launch artwork from a new artist that has joined our New Era family! We are introducing Stella Alesi, who resides in Austin, Texas and has a very distinct style of painting. My coworkers and I, who have been color correcting the digital files from the scans of Stella's original artwork here in the Imaging Department, have noticed her interesting painting style. Her oil paintings have a very soft and subtle texture to them, yet they are bright and alive with color.  The botanicals Stella paints are very realistic imagery. Stella already has several different series of artwork. One of them being her Vanitas series. In the arts, vanitas is a type of symbolic work of art especially associated with Northern European still life painting in Flanders and the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th centuries, though also common in other places and periods. I just love how realistic Stella painted these companion pieces, Backyard Plums I&II. She was even able to capture the dusty-white coating that gives them a glaucous appearance. Another series Stella paints is her Mandalas series. Maṇḍala (मण्डल) is a Sanskrit word that means "circle". In the Buddhist and Hindu religious traditions their sacred art often takes a mandala form. The basic form of most Hindu and Buddhist mandalas is a square with four gates containing a circle with a center point. This piece, Intuition Intenetion, is the first of this series that New Era has launched. Lastly Stella also has a collage series. I find these companion pieces, September 11th I&II, very interesting. The older photographs really draw your interest in on the meaning behind the pieces. The colors, texture and pattern to the collages also make for great focal points. So take a look around on Gallery Direct of all of Stella Alesi's new art we are offering, you're sure to not be disappointed!  
Here’s the last installment of our 3 part series. You can take a look back at Part 1 and Part 2 to find out more about Vintage and your own photo uploads. We’re ending with Gallery Direct’s Exclusive Artists. I think it’s the most exciting part and it’s the reason why we are... who we are. We Love Art. Every single piece of Art first comes through our Imaging Department. Not one thing goes untouched and it goes through quite the process before it actually becomes available for you to purchase. Here’s the rundown on how it all works: The Artist
  • All of our Artist’s are unique. They are all signed to work exclusively with Gallery Direct. So, your art isn’t being sold anywhere else. You can ONLY get it here. There is a wide variety for you to choose from and it is a far cry from ‘boring’. Every art is exciting and new and you can sometimes be the FIRST person to ever buy an Artist’s piece. That’s pretty darn exciting if you ask me.
The Scan
  • We take the Artist’s painting and scan it using a high technology scanner called the Cruse Scanner. This scanner is among the best. It is the ultimate instrument for digital capture and is also used by the Vatican’s Secret Archives, Vatican City and the Czechoslovakian National Library, Prague.
The Color
  • Once it is scanned… we are ready to make it polish and shine. The scan is good when first looking at it. But, we want to make sure it’s perfect. We adjust the color to make sure it looks as close to the original as possible. Adjusting anything we see that can make it better. The texture that the Scanner creates makes it feel... and look... like the real thing.
artwork by Darvin Jones and a new artist, Stella Alesi

We love it back here… It’s like Christmas every day with all the new art.

Here’s a video on how the entire Imaging Department works:

Brittney Melton

New Era Artist Feature: Volume 2

Tweet I’ve been enjoying interviewing our artists. It’s interesting to learn more about the persons behind the art I work with on a daily basis. Today I am going to introduce you to Darvin Jones, one of my favorite New … Read More

I've been enjoying interviewing our artists. It's interesting to learn more about the persons behind the art I work with on a daily basis. Today I am going to introduce you to Darvin Jones, one of my favorite New Era artists. [caption id="attachment_907" align="alignnone" width="300" caption="Darvin's paint brushes"][/caption] Although Darvin would rather be an actor, iron-chef, super hero or astronaut he has embraced his role as an artist. He sums it up; "life is art and art is life, they really are inseparable." [caption id="attachment_908" align="alignnone" width="200" caption="Darvin in his studio"][/caption] Q: What or who inspired you to paint? How did you discover your talent for art? A: I would say my experiences working as an artist assistant and art handler in NY and on the West Coast. I studied art academically not as a practitioner. I started painting to basically see if I could do it and if I could do it better than the art I was hanging on museum walls. I discovered my talent though really out of a necessity during a dim time in my life. [caption id="attachment_909" align="alignnone" width="300" caption="Darvin's paint splattered jeans"][/caption] Q: Do you work certain hours each day or only when you are inspired to work? A: I work every day, I may not paint everyday but I’m in my studio everyday, every week. I wish I had the luxury of painting only when I am inspired, although on second thought then I would probably paint 24/7 and never stop.   Q: You have some very unique titles to your pieces, is there always a deeper meaning to your pieces or do some of them just portray emotions? A: It’s a combination of both. I usually try to sum up the meaning of the painting in the title or what I feel the piece is about. The paintings are always a riddle or a metaphor and so the titles suggest the rhetorical nature of the painting by using an interplay of words to title them. Q: Out of all of the pieces you've painted, which is your most favorite? A: Really? As I heard a mother put it when asked, which kid is her favorite I don’t have favorites, I love them all. [caption id="attachment_913" align="alignnone" width="200" caption=""Where is the Architect" JD162A. Darvin may have trouble picking a favorite, but this is one of my favorites. Here it is hanging in my family room at home."][/caption] Q: Who is your favorite artist? A: Is this a trick question? Hum, I guess it would be a toss up between Matthew Ritchie, Julie Mehretu and Takashi Murakami. Stayed tuned in for my next post!

New Era Artist Feature: Volume 1

Tweet Working in Prepress at New Era I have the privilege to work with and look at original artwork from our New Era artists every day! I received degrees in Architecture and in Art emphasizing in Graphic Design, so needless … Read More

Working in Prepress at New Era I have the privilege to work with and look at original artwork from our New Era artists every day! I received degrees in Architecture and in Art emphasizing in Graphic Design, so needless to say I love Architecture and Art... and art of architecture is even better! This is why one of my favorite New Era artists is Tatara. I was able to conduct an e-interview with Tatara, below are the questions and answers.

Q: Your watercolors show dynamic culture, landscapes, architecture & cityscapes – what inspires you to paint these subjects?

A:  I rarely ask myself what I’m looking for when choosing this or that subject.  But once I am working I find that a sense of ideology reveals itself again and again, one that brushes over and blends all the many different details of a fractured world.  My images are in fact based on the reality of this world because I use photography as a tool.  The way a certain image is taken through the painting process, however, tends to bring out “the environment” of a setting.  And it is this part of a landscape that interests me. Q: Do you paint your subjects in person, from memory or refer to a photograph? A:  I began painting outdoors and on streets. This was exciting to be on location, having to stay focused amid the circulating distractions.  Now as I find myself spending more and more time on each piece, I take photographs and piece them together to recreate what it was like to be standing in that spot, all while painting inside my studio. Q: How long have you been painting? How many pieces have you painted? Do you use other mediums besides watercolor? A:  Though I have always enjoyed drawing with pencil, since my childhood even, I only began painting like I do now 15 years ago.  Watercolor seemed like an extension of drawing.  And now I am painting with oil, which for me has been the biggest step toward painting. [caption id="attachment_662" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Troubled Guest TA173A, wall mural hung in our office gallery by my coworker, Brittney and myself"][/caption] . Q: Which piece that you painted is your favorite and why? A:  Well, because I don’t really think of my work as individual, virtuoso-like creations, and rather as threads in a big fabric, I find this question difficult.  But if we look at “troubled guest” I see a good representation of all that interests me.  It is a house, a very generic house, that has been taken over by streamers of toilet paper.  It is a setting that has cultural undertones, but once removed, it has a serenity reminiscent of the Indian sub-continent or of warm-hearted laughter.  Altogether, the environment surrounding the object reaches from paper edge to paper edge. [caption id="attachment_665" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Original on the left, digital print file on the right inversed in Prepress."][/caption] Q: Your latest works have included painting in inverse colors, how did you come up with this idea and is it difficult to paint in this mode? A: I stumbled upon this technique by looking at snapshot negatives as an alternative figure/ground composition.  I found what I needed in the negative, which then served as the subject of a painting.  Once the painting was completed I recorded it in my inventory like I do all my work.  But I had a simple curiosity which was to observe the painting reversed back to its original color composition.  It seemed full of possibilities because of the newness of layering watercolor upon an ink-black substrate, becoming lighter and lighter, instead of the convention of increased darkness. Is it difficult?  Only when you think about what you’re doing. Hope you enjoyed getting to know one of our artists, stayed tuned for New Era Artists: volume 2!