Pantone Announces 2013 Color of the Year

Tweet As a company that likes to keep up with current trends, we are always looking forward to Pantone’s Color of the Year announcement. It’s never a color chosen lightly. Combing the world for influences from film, art, fashion, travel, … Read More

Pantone 2013 color of the year emeraldAs a company that likes to keep up with current trends, we are always looking forward to Pantone’s Color of the Year announcement. It’s never a color chosen lightly. Combing the world for influences from film, art, fashion, travel, and even technology, Pantone’s process is lengthy and thoughtful. So, "what is the color?" you ask. It's -- drumroll please -- Emerald (or PANTONE 17-5641 for us color nerds). Following last year’s Tangerine Tango, which was all about recharging and moving forward, Emerald reinforces this idea while also promoting balance and harmony. “Green is the most abundant hue in nature – the human eye sees more green than any other color in the spectrum,” says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®. The brilliant and luxurious perception of Emerald also brings along a sense of healing, rejuvenation and renewal. Imagine bringing this jewel-like hue into your home. Whether on the walls in an entryway, bedroom, or dining room, or as bright pops of color throughout, using Emerald can bring a sense of tranquility and well-being into your space. As you might expect, I’ve taken the liberty of compiling some of our favorite Emerald color art that would look great in any home. [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="248"]Modern Flower IV by Laura Gunn Modern Flower IV by Laura Gunn[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="204"]Suburban Perspective I by Sean Jacobs Suburban Perspective I by Sean Jacobs[/caption]   [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="250"]Red Poppies I by Kim Coulter Red Poppies I by Kim Coulter[/caption]

Four Steps to a Better Photo

Tweet With so many great cameras on the market today for great prices almost anyone can take an amazing photo. At Gallery Direct we want your photos to turn out amazing, it makes our job as your printing solution a … Read More

With so many great cameras on the market today for great prices almost anyone can take an amazing photo. At Gallery Direct we want your photos to turn out amazing, it makes our job as your printing solution a lot easier. Here are some tips to taking a better photo. 1. Eliminate red-eye Red-eye is probably the most common and, let’s face it, scariest photo mishap. While there are tons of sources out there that aid in the removal of red-eye, wouldn’t it just be easier to avoid it altogether? What causes it? I was always told that people with light eyes are more prone to red-eye. This may be true, but that never explained why my brown-eyed friends were inflicted with the red-eye as well. Turns out, the main cause is the camera’s flash. The light from the flash reflects off the subject’s eyes and illuminates the blood vessels within the retinas. The result is a red glow scary enough to make you reach for holy water. How do I prevent it? Well, the obvious answer is to avoid using a flash. If you’re unsure about whether or not to use it, take a few test shots first. You might be surprised. If you absolutely need the flash, ask your subject not to look directly into the camera lens. Also, many cameras today come equipped with a red-eye reduction feature. Check your manual to see if this is an option for you. 2. Designate a focal point Have you ever looked at a picture and thought “what am I supposed to be looking at?” Yes, we all have. Even a picture with great lighting and color can be compromised if the subject is nowhere to be found. What causes it? Lots of things, like a competing background, too many landmarks or a subject that’s too far away. Basically just trying to fit too many things in one picture. How do I prevent it? Try not to be distracted by everything around you and focus only what you can see through the viewfinder. Treat what you see as a two-dimensional image with a hierarchy of importance. Sometimes the solution is simply to use the zoom feature or take the shot from a slightly different angle. 3. Make it sharp I know sometimes blurring is intentional and can create really nice photos, but I also know sometimes it’s not. What causes it? Blurry photos are the result of either a moving subject or a moving photographer and the wrong shutter speed. How do I prevent it? If you’re taking an action shot, make sure the shutter speed is set appropriately. Many cameras come equipped with an Action mode that automatically sets it for you. If it’s a low-light situation, use a tripod to keep the camera steady and prevent camera shake. 4. Expose it just right Exposure is the amount of light that passes through the camera lens. Too much light can result in a bright, washed-out photo, while too little light makes the photo look dark. What causes it? Dimly lit spaces with a fast shutter speed, or really bright spaces with a slow shutter speed. How do I prevent it? If you have the option to adjust your shutter speed, do so accordingly. If not, don’t fret, there are still things you can do. If you’re shooting indoors, move near a window or lamp to add extra light. If you’re outdoors and it’s too bright, find a shady spot for your subject. Or, as counterintuitive as it sounds, try using the flash to avoid severe shadows. Overcast days really create the best lighting for photography. Well, there you have it. I can sense your photos getting better by the minute!  

2012 Color of the Year

Tweet PANTONE recently declared Tangerine Tango as the 2012 Color of the Year. If you don’t know what PANTONE is, that’s okay. Allow me to explain. PANTONE is a company best known for its matching system (PMS), which is a … Read More

PANTONE recently declared Tangerine Tango as the 2012 Color of the Year. If you don’t know what PANTONE is, that’s okay. Allow me to explain. PANTONE is a company best known for its matching system (PMS), which is a color-standardization guide primarily used in the printing industry. They provide PANTONE Guides that look a lot like the paint sample strips you get at a home improvement store, and it essentially works the same way. For example, if a company uses PANTONE 19-1664, or True Red, in its logo, they can rest assured that no matter how many different printers are used to print it, the red will stay true to its form. Make sense? Every year PANTONE chooses a color of the year. The color is based on trends seen in fashion and interior design, as well as the general spirit of the times. According to PANTONE, Tangerine Tango provides the “energy boost we need to recharge and move forward.” I know you’re wondering, “Why should I care?” Well, you should care because it means that Tangerine Tango is the new "it" color. It can be seen in the spring lines of many notable fashion designers including Tommy Hilfiger, Nanette Lepore, Cynthia Steffe by Shaun Kearney, Elie Tahari, and Adrienne Vittadini. And it’s popping up in accessories, pillows, and fabrics all over the place. Incorporating Tangerine Tango in the art you choose for your home is the easiest way to modernize and energize your space. I’ve even taken the liberty of compiling a few of my favorite paintings with this color: [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="237" caption="Divulge I by Sylvia Angeli"]Divulge I by Sylvia Angeli[/caption] [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="400" caption="Wall Flower I by Sara Abbott"][/caption] [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="267" caption="Pyracantha by Stella Alesi"]Pyracantha by Stella Alesi[/caption] You can see all of our art with varying shades of orange by clicking here. Your walls will thank you.

The Effects of Color

Tweet Color is powerful. It can cause reactions, sway opinions, raise blood pressure, curb your appetite, and relax your mind, all in a split second.  Our response to color is subliminal, but very real. That’s why the colors you choose … Read More

Color is powerful. It can cause reactions, sway opinions, raise blood pressure, curb your appetite, and relax your mind, all in a split second.  Our response to color is subliminal, but very real. That’s why the colors you choose for your home are so important. Do you want your home to be calm and soothing, or bright and energetic? Or, do you want to combine several hues to create a more balanced feel? You might be thinking that a major color overhaul to your home is too expensive or too much of a commitment, but it doesn’t have to be. Changing out the art on your walls is an easy and affordable way to experiment with the color and mood of your home. There has been a lot of research on the psychology of color, and the following has been found to be true. Black Black is elegant and timeless. When combined with other colors, it adds contrast and helps ground the space. Artwork: Floret Purple III by Sia Aryai   White White symbolizes cleanliness and purity, and goes well with just about any color. It reflects light, so it can make a small room appear big and bright. Artwork: City Bird by Judy Paul   Red Red is a bold and powerful color that demands attention. It's a passionate color that represents love as well as anger. People often experience elevated heart rate and increased enthusiasm in red rooms. Used as an accent, red will immediately draw the eye to that particular element. Artwork: Grid Formation I by Christine Wilkinson Blue Blue is one of the most popular colors, and appeals equally to both men and women. It's often used in bedrooms because of its peaceful and calming properties. It is also said to increase productivity and creativity, making it an excellent color for an office environment. Blue is also known to suppress the appetite, since there are very few blue foods found in nature. Artwork: Equis I by St. John Green Green is the color of renewal, balance, and nature. Like blue, it's a calming color and makes time seem to go by faster. Television studios have “green rooms” to help guests relax before going on the air. Artwork: Zen Garden I by Sia Aryai Yellow Yellow is bright, perky, and cheerful, but it can also evoke anger. Used in abundance, yellow can be overpowering, as it is the most difficult color for the eye to process. Still, it's considered a happy color of optimism and hope. The addition of yellow in a room can add the feeling of sunshine, even if there isn’t any. Artwork: Harmonia IV by Sia Aryai Purple Purple is the color of royalty and mystery. It possesses the energy of red and the calming effects of blue. Used in a room, it can stimulate creativity. Darker versions of the color evoke moodiness and wealth. Artwork: Natural Expression I by Sara Abbott Brown Brown is typically a favorite of men as it is associated with earth, wood, and natural materials.  Shades of brown, including tans, make an excellent backdrop to allow other colors to pop. In a room brown can evoke warmth, dependability, honesty, and friendliness. Artwork: Hidden Meanings XIV by Caroline Ashton

The Gift that Keeps on Hanging

Tweet So you forgot to record the Patriots/Ravens game for your boyfriend and his cable cut out right before Billy Cundiff’s missed field goal. It’s okay. There’s time to redeem yourself before Valentine’s Day. Luckily you have a great memory, … Read More

framed I love youSo you forgot to record the Patriots/Ravens game for your boyfriend and his cable cut out right before Billy Cundiff’s missed field goal. It’s okay. There’s time to redeem yourself before Valentine’s Day. Luckily you have a great memory, and an even better camera, packed full of snapshots from the fantastic time you two had in Cabo last summer and the amazing surprise party you threw for him on his birthday. So go ahead and grab that picture of you looking svelte in your two-piece, or the one where he swears he looks like Robert Downey, Jr. and have it printed for Valentine’s Day. It’s the gift that says, “LOOK AT HOW MUCH FUN WE HAVE TOGETHER.” So next time he’s yelling and throwing things at Tom Brady, he’ll see the picture hanging on the wall and remember how much he loves you. Maybe you will remember that, too, next time he leaves his dirty glass on the coffee table.